Kansas People’s History Project at PSU

Located on the Second Floor, Art Connectors Community Gallery is a new exhibit, the Kansas People’s History Project.  Students in professor Emi Gennis’s typography class worked all semester on poster designs which were displayed along side research material and preliminary sketches. The exhibition is set to show through April 9th.

Kansas has remarkable stories, but many of them are not widely known or taught in our schools. The Kansas People’s History Project (KPHP) will begin to address this gap by making history present and visible in our everyday lives. Inspired by Howard Zinn’s groundbreaking book “A People’s History of United States” which examined history “from the bottom up,” the KPHP will focus on the creation of a series of screen printed broadsides with text narratives, a comprehensive website, and an exhibition that shine a light on lesser known but greatly influential figures and events from Kansas’s past.

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Additional Information can be found at kansaspeopleshistoryproject.com.

Art Connectors Community Gallery Hours:

Monday-Thursday 8:00am – 9:30pm     Friday 8:00am – 4:30pm

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New Exhibition Cairo, Illinois

Gwen Walstrand, a photographer, and Sarah Perkins, a metalsmith/enamellist, are professors from Missouri State University. The artworks will be on display until May 6, 2016. Both artists will present an artist talk April 21st at 3:00pm, with a reception to follow from 4:00 to 6:00pm in the Harry Krug Gallery.

The artworks found in the exhibition, Cairo, Illinois are not collaborative, but are designed to be viewed together.

“In order to have an impact and a narrative that neither could possess on its own. (We) are in different media but with the same subject matter – the town of Cairo, Illinois. Cairo is a unique place with both rich and tragic histories, a visual showcase of all this is best and worst in our American history.” Walstrand and Perkins have stated.

Gwen Walstand and Sarah Perkins Exhibition Statement:
“Driving through what remains of Cairo it appears to an outsider that most of the town, along with its historic buildings and extensive business district, was abandoned within the same year, as nearly all the structures are in the same state of decay. In actuality, many events and circumstances caused precipitous decline of Cairo. The town’s history includes booming success as a shipping town at the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers, elegant hotels and mansions, and an impressive business district. The more recent history is one of race riots, appalling violence, multiple lynchings, domination by white supremacist groups, and eventual boycotts of local businesses by African Americans. The 1920s city of over 15,000 people now is home to under 3,000 people, hundreds of strangely patched up, decaying buildings, and a handful of struggling businesses.

The enameled bowls are a response to not only the reality of present day Cairo, but also to the images of it that were chosen by the photographer. The work seen together offers insight into the working processes of the artists and the choices made by different viewers. The photographer gathers and selects visual material; the metalsmith/enamellist edits the material again and transforms the flat images into three dimensions, but on a functional form that speaks to basic human requirements. The photographs, as both independent images and references for the bowls, are aesthetic explorations of Cairo but with an attempt to consider more deeply the complexity of human histories that form such places.”

 

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University Gallery Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m.

For more information: Rhona McBain at (620) 235 – 4202 or art@pittstate.edu

Collective Fusion, Collective Memories

The Harry Krug Gallery at Pittsburg State University has opened the Collective Fusion: Collective Memories art exhibition, set to run through April 7, 2016. There will also be a related Lecture Series (Interdisciplinary Education through the Arts (IDEA) Series) on February 18, from 10:00am to 4:00pm in the Sunflower Room of the Overman Student Center, where lecturers will present on subjects related to the theme of “Collective Memories.” The reception for the exhibition will be February 18th at 4:00 in the Harry Krug Gallery.

This exhibit will celebrate the wide-ranging talents of faculty, staff, and Friends of the Museum, and will feature works by members of the Pittsburg State family from all across campus. “Pitt State has tremendous talent! We work to showcase that in our students, however there is a tremendous hidden talent among our faculty and staff not directly related to the art department,” Barbara Jemison from the Pittsburg State Purchasing Department said, “This exhibit is an opportunity to let all the artistic talents that usually go unseen to be spotlighted in a special way. For me personally, this will be my first exhibit. I look forward to the feedback of my peers and colleagues to help me grow.” Museum Director Rhona McBain agrees that there is hidden talent in the faculty and says “I truly enjoy this exhibition. Seeing the creativity that everybody brings is somewhat akin to the feeling you get unwrapping an unexpected gift. Wondrous and grateful.”

This exhibit seeks to find a connection between the memories of many in a community to create one larger interconnected collective memory. Some artists chose to create works using the collages of artist Cory Peeke, whose work was displayed in the University Gallery in the Fall of 2015, as inspiration, and use family photos, magazines, and other materials to create their own piece of the memory.

The Interdisciplinary Education through the Arts (IDEA) Series, will strive to present various viewpoints of the idea of a collective memory with lecturers from several different disciplines across the campus and community.

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Gallery Hours:
University Gallery
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Harry Krug Gallery
Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m,  Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

 

University Gallery Exhibit, Lucky Feet, Magic Holes

Don’t miss your chance to see the stunning installation Lucky Feet, Magic Holes by artist Daniel Hunt!

Exhibition:  January 11 – February 6, 2016

Daniel Hunt regularly employs recycled cast aluminum and iron, steel and wood to generate sculptures and installations,  often building the equipment necessary to cast metal. Incorporating narrative and iconographic imagery with a humorous edge, Daniel Hunt’s ideas are inspired by the experiences of living and the study of Theology, which are often shaped by music, literature, film, art history and hot rod culture.

Gallery Hours:
University Gallery
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Harry Krug Gallery
Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m, Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

 

PSU Faculty and Staff Art Making Night

Wednesday, November 18 at 5:30 – 7:30pm in the Harry Krug Gallery, Porter Hall

If you missed the last art making night, you have another chance! We are having a night where we will help you create a collage piece for the Collective Fusion exhibit on Wednesday, November 18.  We will provide materials, but feel free to bring old magazines or photos of your own to make your collage more personal.

Visit our Facebook page for more information.

Daniel Hunt Coming Soon to the University Gallery

Starting on Monday, November 16, 2015, stop by and check out Daniel Hunt’s installation exhibition, Lucky Feet, Magic Holes, in the University Gallery.

Daniel Hunt regularly employs recycled cast aluminum and iron, steel and wood to generate sculptures and installations, often building the equipment necessary to cast metal. Incorporating narrative and iconographic imagery with a humorous edge, Daniel Hunt’s ideas are inspired by the experiences of living and the study of Theology, which are often shaped by music, literature, film, art history and hot rod culture.

Galleries Hours:
University Gallery
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Harry Krug Gallery
Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m, Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The Conversation Tree

Help the Conversation Tree in the Harry Krug gallery grow!  Come by Porter Hall to describe the feeling or feelings expressed by one of the works or art created in Pittsburg State University’s Permanent Collection Exhibition.  The conversation tree is inspired by the Piet Mondrian’s, The Gray Tree, 1912.  To learn more about Piet Mondrian, visit the Piet Mondrian Trust Website.

Take a close look at the artwork on display with the Gallery Guide located in the Harry Krug Gallery.  Find components of certain works and tell us what your collection would be if you were a curator.

Also, check out the video I Could Do That by The Art Assignment.  “So you look at a work of art and think to yourself, I could have done that. And maybe you really could have, but the issue here is more complex than that — why didn’t you? Why did the artist? And why does it have an audience?  You might find it’s not quite as simple as you think (The Art Assignment).”

Highlights from the PSU Permanent Collection

Come see pieces from the Permanent Collection in the Harry Krug Gallery!  This exhibit will be up until January 8, 2016.

“The Pittsburg Museum of Art is excited to present a new exhibition featuring two distinctive styles of American art—abstraction and pop art—chosen from its permanent collection.  Over years, the Museum has vigorously developed and expanded its collection from 251 to 445 artworks, most of which were donated by local collectors, contemporary artists, and faculty members.  For the first time in the history of the Museum, these select works are on display in the Harry Krug Gallery.  Most of the works featured were completed in the 1960s and the 1970s, a period when American abstract expressionism and pop art rapidly flourished.  Celebrating the choices made by collectors within our own community, PSU is able to view and enjoy a unique sample of the new aesthetics of that era.  Abstraction has been understood as “the language of freedom,” not obliged to follow any rules at all.  American abstraction is particularly famous for its highly charged human emotions, a direct expression of the artists’ inner lives.  This distinctive style was soon followed by the rise of pop art in the 1960s, which focused on American consumer culture.  The pop artists used culture as the source of art, highlighting signs and symbols of modern commercial life.  Abstraction and pop images captured the post-war spirit of America.  With this exhibition, the Museum of Art is pleased to introduce this significant collection of American abstraction and pop art to the wider community in Pittsburg and beyond.”

Dr. Li-Lin Tseng Curator’s Statement

Gallery Hours:

University Gallery
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Harry Krug Gallery
Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m, Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

University Gallery Exhibit, a higher education

Come by Porter Hall now until Friday, November 6th to see Cory Peeke’s exhibit, a higher education.

“I’m a collage maker for much the same reason I’m a curator – I love images. This affection has led me to collect remnant imagery; the largely ignored and seemingly inconsequential bits of ephemera that once had a purpose, still have a presence, but now idle in disuse. I combine, layer, juxtapose, glue, tape and re-contextualize these bits and pieces of detritus in order to reincarnate and recharge them. Through the process of collage these snippets of the past combine to become something both fresh and familiar.

The most recent works explore the duality that is the transient, disposable nature of our culture through the lens of the book and the status of higher education.”

-Cory Peeke

Galleries Hours:
University Gallery
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Harry Krug Gallery
Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m, Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m..